Ann-Maree Vallence  from Murdoch University in Perth Australia.
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9360 7464

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A.Vallence@murdoch.edu.au

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    Dr Ann-Maree Vallence

    Australian Research Council DECRA Research Fellow I Senior Lecturer

    About me

    Dr Ann-Maree Vallence co-leads the Action and Cognition Research Group in the disciplines of Psychology and Exercise Science at Murdoch University. Ann-Maree is a Research Fellow in cognitive neuroscience, currently funded by an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (2019-2021) and previously funded by a National Health and Medical Research Council Early Career Fellowship (2015-2018). Ann-Maree is the Western Australian State Representative for the Australasian Neuroscience Society and Vice President for the Australasian Brain Stimulation Society, and in 2018, was awarded a WA Young Tall Poppy Science Award.

    Ann-Maree’s research uses neurophysiological and applied behavioural measures to investigate sensorimotor control, learning, and cognitive function in healthy and clinical populations. Ann-Maree’s research interests include:

    • Characterising age-related changes in the human cortical motor network and the role of these changes in age-related voluntary movement decline;
    • Understanding the mechanisms of cortical plasticity and their role in learning;
    • Investigating factors that influence the induction of cortical plasticity (e.g. the stress hormone cortisol);
    • Understanding the role of altered cortical plasticity in disease and injury (e.g. burn injury);
    • Investigating how we can best harness the capacity of the brain for cortical plasticity in rehabilitation following brain injury (e.g. stroke).

    Ann-Maree was awarded her PhD from the University of Western Australia, and subsequently worked as a University Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Neuromotor Plasticity and Development Group at the University of Adelaide, and a Visiting Research Fellow in the Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders at University College London. In 2015, Ann-Maree moved to Murdoch University as an NHMRC Early Career Research Fellow in the School of Psychology and Exercise Science, and in 2019 secured an ARC DECRA to continue her role as a Research Fellow at Murdoch University.

    Teaching area

    Currently, I guest lecture in the areas of motor control and cognitive neuroscience, and supervise research students (PhD, DPsych, Masters, Honours).

    Previously, I have taught undergraduate cognitive neuroscience, behavioural neuroscience, and specialist research practicals (behavioural neuroscience), and have lectured in a postgraduate neurophysiotherapy masters program.

    Research areas

    • Characterising age-related changes in the human cortical motor network and the role of these changes in age-related voluntary movement decline;
    • Understanding the mechanisms of cortical plasticity and their role in learning;
    • Investigating factors that influence the induction of cortical plasticity (e.g. the stress hormone cortisol);
    • Understanding the role of altered cortical plasticity in disease and injury (e.g. burn injury);
    • Investigating how we can best harness the capacity of the brain for cortical plasticity in rehabilitation following brain injury (e.g. stroke).

    Awards and grants

    AWARDS AND RECOGNITION OF ACHIEVEMENT

    WA Young Tall Poppy Science Award (2018)

    Vice Chancellor’s Excellence in Research Award for Early Career Development and Achievement, Murdoch University (2016)

    Global Youth Scientists Summit: selected by the Australian Research Council as one of only ten Australian Early Career Researchers to attend the Summit (2016)

    Symposium for Western Australian Neurosciences Most Outstanding Presentation (2015)

    European Brain and Behaviour Society Young Investigator Award (2014)

    UWA Office of Convocation Ken and Julie Michael Postgraduate Travel Award (2011)

    Australian Federation of University Women Mary Walters Postgraduate Travel Scholarship (2011)

    Oral Presentation Award: Symposium of Western Australian Neuroscience Aus. Neuromuscular Research Institute (2010)

     

    COMPETITIVE RESEARCH FUNDING

    Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award

    Project: Does disconnection in the aging brain cause age-related movement decline?

    Total: $372,014

    Funded: 2019-2021

     

    Neurotrauma Research Program

    Project:Strengthening functional connectivity in the motor system to reduce falls following stroke.

    Total: $92,875

    Investigators: VALLENCE, A.M, Hill, K.D., Etherton-Beer, C.

    Funded: 2017

     

    Brain Foundation

    Project:A tailored music therapy and real-time biofeedback mobile phone app to promote motor rehabilitation following neurotrauma.

    Total: $20,000

    Investigators: VALLENCE, A.M, Etherton-Beer, C., Rosenberg, M., Shaykevich, A., Rodger, J.

    Funded: 2017

     

    Western Australian Department of Health: New Independent Researcher Infrastructure Support Award

    Total: $10,000

    Investigator: VALLENCE, A.M.

    Funded: 2016

     

    Western Australian Department of Health Merit Award (NHMRC near-miss)

    Project:Strengthening functional connectivity in the aging brain to improve voluntary movement.

    Total: $75,000

    Investigator: VALLENCE, A.M.

    Funded: 2016

     

    Rebecca L Cooper Medical Research Foundation

    Project:Strengthening functional connectivity in the aging brain to improve voluntary movement.

    Total: $25,000

    Investigator: VALLENCE, A.M.

    Funded: 2016

     

    Neurotrauma Research Program

    Project:A tailored music therapy and real-time biofeedback mobile phone app to promote motor rehabilitation following neurotrauma.

    Total: $138,981

    Investigators: CI: Rosenberg, M., VALLENCE, A.M., Rodger, J., Shaykevich, A.

    Funded: 2016

     

    National Stroke Foundation

    Project:TOPS: tDCS to Optimise Participation in Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Total: $16,444

    Investigators: CI: Etherton-Beer, C.; AIs: Lui, Y., Radalj, M.; Singer, B., VALLENCE, A.M.

    Funded: 2016

     

    Australia-Germany Joint Research Co-operation (DAAD)

    Project: Seeing without awareness.

    Total: $47,347

    Chief Investigators: O Shea, R.P., Roeber, U., Muller, D., VALLENCE, A.M., Marzecov, A., Scharf, F., Roberts, G., Grimm, S., Anderson, M., Bader, M., Male, A., Crier, J. Widmann, A., & Schrger, E

    Funded: 2016-2017

     

    National Health and Medical Research Council Early Career Fellowship

    Project: Reconnecting the ageing motor system.

    Total: $309,436

    Funded: 2015-2018

     

    Endeavour Postdoctoral Research Fellowship

    Project: Reconnecting the aging motor system.

    Mentor: Professor John C Rothwell, University College London

    Total: $24,500

    Funded: 2014

     

    Women’s and Children’s Hospital Foundation Project Grant (SA)

    Project: Neural and hormonal factors influencing consolidation in children born preterm.

    Chief Investigators: VALLENCE, A.M., Pitcher, J.B., Ridding, M.C., Hodyl, N.A.

    Total: $53,462

    Funded: 2013

     

     

    Events and speaking engagements

    MEDIA


    How scientists are fighting against gender bias in conference speaker lineups.’ https://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2019/02/how-scientists-are-fighting-against-gender-bias-conference-speaker-lineups

    https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/reconnecting-the-aging-brain-tickets-33610187977

    http://www.abc.net.au/radio/perth/programs/wa-afternoons/music-therapy/8434118

     

    SELECTED ORAL CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

    Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Society Meeting 2016 (Newcastle, NSW 24-27 Nov 2016). Connectivity between the supplementary motor area and the primary motor cortex declines with age.

    Australasian Brain Stimulation Meeting (Melbourne, Victoria 28-29 July 2016). Long-interval intracortical inhibition is asymmetric in younger but not older adults.

    Sensorimotor Control Meeting 2015 (Brisbane, QLD 20-21 Feb 2015). Reproducibility of neuroplastic responses induced by theta-burst stimulation.

    European Brain and Behaviour Congress 2014 (Brides Les Baines, France, 17-22 March 2014). Pathophysiology of chronic pain: what non-invasive brain stimulation can tell us.

    Australian Neuroscience Society Sensorimotor Satellite Meeting 2014 (Adelaide, South Australia, 1 Feb 2014). The influence of cortical alpha oscillatory activity on motor cortical excitability and plasticity induction.

    Australasian Brain Stimulation Meeting (Melbourne, Victoria, 24-26 July 2013). Long-lasting intracortical inhibition and facilitation in the human primary motor cortex.

    10th Motor Control and Human Skill Conference (Mandurah, Western Australia, 29 Nov–2 Dec 2011). Plasticity of forearm flexor but not extensor representations in human motor cortex during ischemic nerve block.

    Symposium of Western Australian Neuroscience (Perth, April 2011). Motor cortex reorganization of a forearm flexor but not a forearm extensor during ischemic nerve block.

     

    SELECTED INVITED DEPARTMENTAL SEMINARS

    Fiona Stanley Hospital Grand Round, Mental Health. Clinical and research models for the use of rTMS: opportunities and challenges. (8 Nov 2016)

    Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research. Plasticity and functional connectivity in the human motor cortex. (24 June 2015)

    Department of Psychological Sciences, Centre for Brain Imaging University of California Santa Barbara. Investigation and characterization of human cortical plasticity using non-invasive brain stimulation. (11 April 2014)

    Movement Science Group, Columbia University, New York City. Investigation and characterization of human cortical plasticity using non-invasive brain stimulation. (3 April 2014)

    Institute of Medical Research (INSERM), Lyon. Investigation and characterization of human cortical plasticity using non-invasive brain stimulation. (21 March 2014)

    Centre for Neuroscience Seminar Series, Flinders University, Adelaide. Non-invasive induction of plasticity in the human cortex: Uses and limitations. (23 October 2013)

    Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA), Sydney. Plasticity of the primary motor cortex: studies using non-invasive brain stimulation. (25 January 2013)

    Neuromotor Plasticity and Development Group, University of Adelaide. Reorganization of human primary motor cortex during ischemic nerve block: studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation. (22 September 2011)

    Brain Plasticity Group, Oxford Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain, University of Oxford. In the reorganized cortex not all muscles are equal: reorganization of a forearm flexor but not a forearm extensor during ischemic nerve block. (June 2011)

    Institute of Medical Research (INSERM), Lyon. Reorganization of human primary motor cortex during ischemic nerve block: studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation. (January 2011)

    Professional and community service

    INVITED REVIEWER

    Cortex; Journal of Neurophysiology; Clinical Neurophysiology; Brain Stimulation; Brain Research; Neuroscience Letters

     

    INVITED EXTERNAL REVIEWER

    Rebecca Cooper Medical Research Foundation 2016; Neurological Foundation of New Zealand 2016; Velux Stiftung (Switzerland) Project Grant 2014; NHMRC Project Grant Scheme 2013

     

    COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

    Invited Mentor: The Innovators Tea Party, Health Sciences and Medicine session 2017 https://innovatorsteaparty.org/

    Woodside Corporate and Legal Away Day (2016): Harnessing the brain’s capacity for neuroplasticity.

    Stories of Australian Science (2016): http://stories.scienceinpublic.com.au/2016/brainconnections

    Aged Care Insite (2016): https://soundcloud.com/agedcareinsite/ann-maree-vallence-from-murdoch-university

    Australian Brain Bee WA Finals (2016) guest presentation.

    Doctoral and masters supervisions

    Current

    PhD: Katherine Hankinson, commenced 2016; Brittany Rurak, commenced 2017; Kym Wnasbrough, commencing 2017

    Masters: Casey Whife, 2016

    Honours: Aleks Miljevic; Liam Quinn; Justin Andre

    Publications

    1. Whife, C., Vallence, A.M., Edgar, D., and Wood, F. (In Press). No difference observed in short-interval intracortical inhibition in older burn-injury survivors compared to non-injured older adults: a pilot study. Burns (JBUR_2018_250 accepted 28/02/2019).
    2. Muller, S., Vallence, A.M., Winstein, C. (2018). Investigation of perception-motor behaviour across the expert athlete to disabled patient skill continuum can advance theory and practical application. Journal of Motor Behaviour, 50: 697.
    3. Quinn, L., Miljevic, A., Rurak, B.K., Marinovic, W., and Vallence, A.M. (2018). Differential plasticity of extensor and flexor motor cortex representations following visuomotor adaptation. Experimental Brain Research, 236: 2945.
    4. Garside, T., Wood, F., and Vallence, A.M. (2018). Investigating the cortical silent period in chronic burns using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Burns 44: 1195.
    5. Huntley, M.K., Muller, S., and Vallence, A.M. (2018). Corticospinal excitability is modulated by distinct movement patterns during action observation. Experimental Brain Research 236: 1067.
    6. Green, P., Ridding, M.C., Hill, K.D., Semmler, J.G., Drummond, P.D., and Vallence, A.M. (2018). Supplementary motor area—primary motor cortex facilitation in younger but not older adults. Neurobiology of Aging, 64: 58.
    7. Vallence, A.M., Smalley, E., Drummond, P.D., and Hammond, G.H. (2017). Long interval intracortical inhibition is asymmetric in young but not older adults. Journal of Neurophysiology, 118: 1581.
    8. Hordacre, B., Goldsworthy, M.R., Vallence, A.M., Darvishi, S., Moezzi, B., Hamada, M., Rothwell, J.C., and Ridding, M.C. (2017). Variability in neural excitability and plasticity induction in the human cortex: a brain stimulation study. Brain Stimulation, 10: 588.
    9. Tang, A., Iyer, K., Vallence, A.M., Fujiyama, H. (2017). Non-linear changes to corticospinal excitability induced with increasing intensities of transcranial direct current stimulation. Journal of Physiology, 595: 1445.
    10. Hinder, M., Fujiyama, H., and Vallence, A.M. (2017). Response to “response to Hoy ‘Gender imbalance and brain stimulation conferences: we have a problem and it is everyone’s problem’”. Brain Stimulation, 10: 158-159.
    11. Muller, S., Gurisik, Y., Hecimovich, M., Harbaugh, G., and Vallence, A.M. (2017). Individual differences in short-term anticipation training for high-speed interceptive skill. Journal of Motor Learning and Development, 5: 160-176.
    12. *Goldsworthy, M.R., *Vallence, A.M., Hodyl, N.A., Semmler, J.G., Pitcher, J.B., & Ridding, M.C. (2016). Probing changes in corticospinal excitability following theta-burst stimulation of the human primary motor cortex. Clinical Neurophysiology, 127: 740-747. *Authors contributed equally.
    13. *Goldsworthy, M.R., *Vallence, A.M., Yang, R., Pitcher, J.B., & Ridding, M.C. (2016). Combined transcranial alternating current stimulation and cTBS: a novel approach for neuroplasticity induction. European Journal of Neuroscience, 43: 572-579. *Authors contributed equally.
    14. Hodyl, N.A., Schneider, L.A., Vallence, A.M., Clow, A., Ridding, M.C., & Pitcher, J.B. (2016). The cortisol awakening response is associated with performance of a serial sequence reaction time task. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 100: 12-18.
    15. Marneweck, M. and Vallence, A.M. (2015). The neural bases of different levels of action understanding. Journal of Neurophysiology, 115:1085-1087.
    16. *Vallence, A.M., *Goldsworthy, M.R., Hodyl, N.A., Semmler, J.G., Pitcher, J.B., & Ridding, M.C. (2015). Inter- and intra-subject variability of motor cortex plasticity following continuous theta-burst stimulation. Neuroscience, 304: 266-278. *Authors contributed equally.
    17. Vallence, A.M. and Drummond, P. (2015). Are movement disturbances in complex regional pain syndrome intentional? European Journal of Pain, 19: 877-878.
    18. Pitcher, J.B., Doeltgen, S.H., Goldsworthy, M.R., Schneider, L.A., Vallence, A.M., Smith, A.E., Semmler, J.G., McDonnell, M.N., & Ridding, M.C. (2015). A comparison of two methods for estimating 50% of the maximal motor evoked potential. Clinical Neurophysiology, 126: 2337-2341.
    19. Vallence, A.M. and Ridding MC. (2014). Non-invasive induction of plasticity in the human cortex: Uses and limitations. Cortex, 58: 261-271.
    20. Vallence, A.M., Schneider, L.A., Pitcher, J.B., & Ridding, M.C. (2014). Long-interval facilitation and inhibition are differentially affected by conditioning stimulus intensity over different time courses. Neuroscience Letters, 570: 114-116.
    21. Clow, A., Law, R., Evans, P., Vallence, A.M., Hodyl, N., Goldsworthy, N., Rothwell JC. & Ridding, MC. (2014). Day differences in the cortisol awakening response (CAR) correlate with day differences in synaptic plasticity in the brain. Stress, 17: 219-223.
    22. Vallence, A.M., Goldsworthy, M.R. (2014). Can non-invasive brain stimulation enhance function in the ageing brain? Journal of Neurophysiology, 111: 1-3.
    23. Singer, B., Vallence, A.M., Cleary, S., Cooper, I., Loftus, A. (2013). The effect of an EMG triggered electrical stimulation program ± bilateral training on arm function and inter-hemispheric inhibition after stroke: a randomized, controlled pilot study. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, 31: 681-691.
    24. Vallence, A.M., Kurylowicz L., & Ridding, M.C. (2013). A comparison of neuroplastic responses to non-invasive brain stimulation protocols and motor learning in healthy adults. Neuroscience Letters, 549: 151-156.
    25. Goldsworthy M., Vallence, A.M. (2013). The role of ß-amyloid in Alzheimer’s disease-related neurodegeneration. Journal of Neuroscience 33(32): 12910-12911.
    26. Vallence, A.M., Smith, A., Tabor A., Rolan, P., Ridding, M.C. (2013). Chronic tension-type headache is associated with impaired motor learning. Cephalalgia, 33(12): 1048-1054.
    27. Vallence, A.M., Hammond G., & Reilly, K. (2012). Increased corticospinal excitability of flexor but not extensor muscles induced by ischemic nerve block. Journal of Neurophysiology. 107: 3417-27.
    28. Vallence, A.M., Reilly K., & Hammond G. (2012). Excitability of intracortical inhibitory and facilitatory circuits following induction of ischemic nerve block. Restorative Neurology & Neuroscience, 30: 345-354.
    29. Hammond, G., & Vallence, A.M. (2007). Modulation of long-interval intracortical inhibition and the silent period by voluntary contraction. Brain Research, 1158: 63-70.
    30. Hammond, G.R., & Vallence, A.M. (2006). Asymmetrical facilitation of motor-evoked potentials following motor practice. Neuroreport, 17: 805-807