Professor Garry Rodan
PhD (Murdoch)

Professor - Politics and International Studies

About me

I am Director of the Asia Research Centre and Professor of Politics and International Studies in the School of Management and Governance. I am also a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. My thematic research interest is in the relationship between capitalist development, social change and and political regime directions in Southeast Asia. Attempting to characterize and explain dynamic and durable forms of authoritarian rule has been a particular focus, especially in Singapore.

My authored books include The Politics of Accountability in Southeast Asia (Oxford University Press, 2014, with Caroline Hughes), Transparency and Authoritarian Rule in Southeast Asia (RoutledgeCurzon 2004) and The Political Economy of Singapore’s Industrialization (Macmillan, 1989), while my edited and co-edited books include Neoliberalism and Conflict in Asia After 9/11 (Routledge 2005), The Political Economy of Southeast Asia (Oxford University Press 1997, 2001, 2006), Political Oppositions in Industrializing Asia (Routledge 1996), Singapore Changes Guard (Longman 1993) and Southeast Asia in the 1990s: Authoritarianism, Capitalism and Democracy (Allen & Unwin 1993).

Teaching area

I am coordinator of the capstone Politics unit P341 Governance and Politics in the 21st Century.

Research areas

  • Political regime directions in Southeast Asia.
  • Democratic and non-democratic political participation in Southeast Asia.
  • Democratic and non-democratic ideologies in Southeast Asia.
  • The politics of accountability reform in Southeast Asia.
  • The political economy of development in Southeast Asia.
  • State-civil society relations in Southeast Asia.

 

Current projects

  • ‘Representation and Political Regimes in Southeast Asia,’ Australian Research Council Discovery Project Grant, 2010-mid 2015, Australian Professorial Fellowship, $613,182.

Awards and grants

National Research Grants:

  • ‘Representation and Political Regimes in Southeast Asia,’ Australian Research Council Discovery Project Grant, 2010-14, Australian Professorial Fellowship, $613,182.
  • ‘The Politics of Accountability Reform in Southeast Asia’, Australian Research Council Discovery Project Grant, 2009-11, $156,000 (with Caroline Hughes)
  • ‘Contestation or Regulation? New Politics in Southeast Asia’, Australian Research Council Discovery Project Grant, 2005-6, $75,000 (with Kanishka Jayasuriya).
  • ‘Market Development and Media Censorship: the International Press and Electronic Business Information Services’, Australian Research Council Large Grant, 1999-2000, $56,000.
Awards
  • Murdoch University Vice Chancellor’s Excellence in Research Award for Distinguished and Sustained Achievement, 2007.
  • The Frank Cass Prize for Best Article in Democratization, 2007, ‘Beyond Hybrid Regimes: More Participation, Less Contestation in Southeast Asia’ (with Kanishka Jayasuriya).
  • Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia

 

Events and speaking engagements

  • ‘Cold War Legacies, Capitalism and Political Representation in Southeast Asia’ Keynote Address, Geopolitical Economies of Development and Democratization in East Asia Roundtable, Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, University of British Columbia, 26-29 May 2015.
  • ‘Limits to Consensus Representation in Singapore’, The Politics of Multipolarity Workshop, Inaugural Joint Workshop of the Department of Asian and International Studies and the Southeast Asia Research Centre, City University of Hong Kong and the Asia Research Centre, Murdoch University, held at City University of Hong Kong, 20-21 November 2014.
  • ‘Political Participation and Ideologies of Representation in the Philippines: Contention over Bottum-Up Budgeting’, Inaugural Association of Asian Studies in Asia Conference, Asia in Motion: Heritage and Transformation, Singapore 17-19 July 2014.
  • ‘New Challenges in the Political Management of Capitalism in Singapore’, James Jackson Memorial Lecture, Asian Studies Association of Australia 20th Biennial Conference, AsiaScapes: Contesting Borders, University of Western Australia, 30 September-2 October 2013.
  • ‘Authoritarian Rule and Electoral Trends in Singapore’, Kompas Symposium on ASEAN and Political Change in Southeast Asia, Asia Research Centre, Murdoch University, 20 March 2014.
  • ‘Moral Ideologies and Accountability Coalitions in Southeast Asia’, Australian Political Studies Association Conference, Murdoch University, 30 September-2 October 2013.
  • Civil Society Activism and Political Parties in Malaysia: Differences over Local Representation’, Challenging Inequalities: Contestation and Regime Change in East and Southeast Asia, joint workshop of the Asia Research Centre, Murdoch University and the University of Stockholm, held at Murdoch University, 12-13 July 2013.
  • ‘Malaysia’s Reform Movement and Local Democracy: Elections versus Appointments’, Australian Political Studies Association Conference, University of Tasmania, Hobart, 24-26 September 2012.
  • ‘Competing Ideologies of Representation in Southeast Asia,’ Power, Principles and Participation in the Global Information Age, International Studies Association Annual Convention, San Diego, 1-4 April, 2012.
  • ‘Horizontal Accountability Institutions and Political Contestation’ (with Caroline Hughes), Regions, States and Peoples in a World of Many Worlds, International Studies Association Asia-Pacific Regional Section Inaugural Conference, University of Queensland, Brisbane, 29-30 September, 2011.
  • ‘Ideological Coalitions and the International Promotion of Social Accountability: The Philippines and Cambodia Cases Compared’ (with Caroline Hughes), Crisis, Uncertainty and Democracy, Australian Political Studies Association Conference, Old Parliament House, Canberra, 26-28 September, 2011.
  • ‘Consultative Authoritarianism and Regime Change Analysis: Implications of the Singapore Case,’ Association of Asian Studies and International Convention of Asia Scholars joint conference, Honolulu, 31 March-3 April, 2011.
  • ‘Progress and Limits in Regional Cooperation: Australia and Southeast Asia,’ Australia in World Affairs 2006-2010 workshop, Canberra, 25-26 September 2010.
  • ‘New Modes of Governance in Asia: Implications for Analysing Gaming Regulation in Macau’, Keynote, Gaming, Governance and Public Policy in Macau, University of Macau, 3-4 December 2009.
  • ‘Singapore: The Political Accountability Threat of Human Rights,’ Human Rights in Asia Workshop, University of Melbourne, 1-2 October, 2009.
  • ‘New Modes of Political Participation and Singapore’s Nominated Members of Parliament,’ Australian Institute of International Affairs, University of Western Australia, 27 October, 2009.
  • ‘The Politics of Accountability in Southeast Asia’, Still the Asian Century? Conference, Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Birmingham, UK, 10-12 September 2008.

Professional and community service

Journal Editorial Boards:

  • Philippine Journal of Political Science, 2012-
  • The Australian Journal of Political Science, 2011-
  • Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs, 2010-
  • Contemporary Politics, 2008-
  • The Australian Journal of International Affairs, 2008-
  • Kasarinlan: Philippine Journal of Third World Studies, 2003-
  • The Pacific Review, 2002-
  • Global Economic Review, 2000-

Other Professional Service:

  • Australian Institute for International Affairs Research Committee, 2010-
  • Australian Reader, Australian Research Council, 2005-
  • International Expert Assessor for the Australian Research Council, 2003-4
  • Assessor for the Australia-Netherlands Research Collaboration, 2008-2009
  • Assessor for Research Grants Council, Hong Kong, 2006-
  • Advisory Board member, Southeast Asia Research Centre, City University of Hong Kong, 2002-

Doctoral and masters supervisions

I am able to supervise projects examining aspects of political regime dynamics and new modes of governance in Southeast Asia. This includes ideological and institutional changes in either democratic or authoritarian regimes. Studies into state-civil society relationships and changing structures of state power are within my supervisory capacity, as are examinations of the forms of competing notions and support bases of political transparency, accountability and representation. This includes projects interested in understanding how changing patterns of economic and social organisation associated with capitalist and market development relate to support for, and opposition to, particular institutions and ideologies.

Current and recent projects under my supervision include: the implications of increasing labour migration in Southeast Asia for institutions and ideologies of political representation; media-elite interactions in post-Soeharto Indonesia; state transformations and risk management at the fringes of the global order; the politics of the World Bank’s promotion of neoliberal institutionalism in Southeast Asia; the Salafi movement and Internet usage in contemporary Indonesia.

Publications

Chapters

  • Rodan, G., (2015),Conflict, oppositional spaces and political representation in Southeast Asia,In: Routledge Handbook of Southeast Asian Democratization, Routledge, pages 117 to 134.

Books:

  • The Politics of Accountability in Southeast Asia: The Dominance of Moral Ideologies (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014) [co-authored with Caroline Hughes]
  • The Political Economy of South-East Asia: Markets, power and contestation (Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2006, pp. 336) [co-edited with K. Hewison & R. Robison]
  • Neoliberalism and Conflict in Asia after 9/11 (London & New York: RoutledgeCurzon (2006, 253 pp.; paperback 2009) [co-editor with K. Hewison]
  • Transparency and Authoritarian Rule in Southeast Asia: Singapore and Malaysia (London: Routledge, 2004, 272 pp.; paperback edition 2005)
  • The Political Economy of South-East Asia: Conflict, Crises, and Change (Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2001, 306 pp.) [joint editor with K.Hewison & R. Robison]
  • Singapore, International Library of Social Change in Asia-Pacific Series (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2001, 520 pp.) [editor]
  • The Political Economy of South-East Asia: An Introduction (Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1997, 299 pp.) [joint editor with K.Hewison & R.Robison]
  • Political Oppositions in Industrialising Asia (London & New York: Routledge, 1996, 321 pp.) [editor]
  • Southeast Asia in the 1990s: Authoritarianism, Democracy and Capitalism (Sydney: Allen & Unwin, 1993, 249 pp.) [joint editor with K. Hewison & R.Robison]
  • Singapore Changes Guard: Social, Political and Economic Directions in the 1990s (Melbourne: Longman Cheshire, 1993, 209 pp.) [editor]
  • The Political Economy of Singapore’s Industrialization: National State and International Capital (London: Macmillan; New York: St Martin’s Press, 1989, 266 pp.) Translated into Japanese by Keiko Tsuji Tamura for San’ichi Press, Tokyo, 1992.

Guest Editor of Journals:

  • Beyond Hybrid Regimes’, Special Issue, Democratization, 14(5), 2007 [with Kanishka Jayasuriya]
  • Markets in Transition: Conflict, Political Regimes, and the “War on Terror” in East and Southeast Asia’, Two Feature Issues, Critical Asian Studies, 36(3) & 36(4), 2004. [with Kevin Hewison]
  • Electronic Media, Markets and Civil Society in East and Southeast Asia’, Special Edition, The Pacific Review, 16(4), 2003.

Monographs:

  • ‘The Prospects for Civil Society in Southeast Asia’, Eastern Asia Policy Papers, No. 18 (University of Toronto – York University Joint Centre for Asia Pacific Studies, 1997, 28pp.)
  • ‘Singapore’s ‘Second Industrial Revolution’: State Policy and Foreign Investment,” ASEAN-Australian Economic Papers, No. 18 (ASEAN-Australian Joint Research Project, Kuala Lumpur and Canberra: 1985, 68 pp.)

Refereed Journal Articles Since 2000:

  • ‘Civil Society Activism and Political Parties in Malaysia: Differences over Local Representation,’ Democratization, 21(5), 2014, pp. 824-45.
  • ‘Competing Ideologies of Political Representation in Southeast Asia,’ Third World Quarterly, 33(2), 2012, pp. 335-56.
  • ‘Ideological Coalitions and the International Promotion of Social Accountability: The Philippines and Cambodia Compared,’ International Studies Quarterly, 56(2), 2012, pp. 367–380.[with Caroline Hughes]
  • ‘New Modes of Political Participation and Singapore’s Nominated Members of Parliament’, Government and Opposition, 44(4), 2009, pp. 438-62.
  • ‘Capitalist Development, Regime Transitions and New Forms of Authoritarianism in Asia’, The Pacific Review, 22(1), 2009, pp. 23-47. [with Kanishka Jayasuriya]
  • ‘Accountability and Authoritarianism: Human Rights in Malaysia and Singapore’, Journal of Contemporary Asia, 39(2), 2009, pp. 180-203.
  • ‘New Trajectories for Political Regimes in Southeast Asia’, Democratization, 14(5), 2007, pp. 767-772. [with Kanishka Jayasuriya]
  • ‘Beyond Hybrid Regimes: More Participation, Less Contestation in Southeast Asia’, Democratization, 14(5), 2007, pp. 773-794. [with Kanishka Jayasuriya] Awarded the Frank Cass Prize for the best article inDemocratization published in 2007.
  • ‘The Technocratic Politics of Administrative Participation: Case Studies of Singapore and Vietnam’,Democratization, 14(5), 2007, pp. 795-815. [with Kanishka Jayasuriya]
  • ‘Singapore in 2005: Vision of a “vibrant and cosmopolitan” city-state without political pluralism’, Asian Survey, 46(1), 2006, pp. 180-6.
  • ‘Political Regimes and the “War on Terror” in Southeast Asia’, First International Sources of Insecurity Conference, 17-19 November 2004, Refereed Conference Proceedings, Melbourne: The Globalism Institute, RMIT, 2004.
  • ‘Singapore in 2004: Long-Awaited Leadership Transition’, Asian Survey, 45(1), 2005, pp. 140-5.
  • ‘Governance and Conflict’, Critical Asian Studies, 36(4), 2004, pp. 567-9. [with Kevin Hewison]
  • ‘Closing the Circle? Globalization, Conflict, and Political Regimes’, Critical Asian Studies, 36(3), 2004, pp. 383-404. [with Kevin Hewison]
  • ‘International Capital, Singapore’s State Companies, and Security’, Critical Asian Studies, 36(3), 2004, pp. 479-499.
  • ‘Embracing Electronic Media but Suppressing Civil Society: Authoritarian Consolidation in Singapore’, The Pacific Review, 16(4), 2003, pp. 503-24
  • ‘Do Markets Need Transparency? The Pivotal Cases of Singapore and Malaysia’, New Political Economy, 7(1), 2002, pp. 23-47. 
  • ‘Asian Crisis, Transparency and the International Media in Singapore’, The Pacific Review, 13(2), 2000, pp. 217-242.

Book Chapters since 2000:

  • ‘Southeast Asian Activism and Limits to Independent Political Space,’ in Michele Ford (editor), Social Activism in Southeast Asia, London: Routledge, 2013, pp. 22-39.
  • ‘Hybrid Regimes: A Social Foundation Approach,’ in Jeffrey Haynes (editor), Routledge Handbook on Democratization (London: Routledge, 2012, pp. 175-189). [with Kanishka Jayasuriya]
  • ‘Consultative Authoritarianism and Regime Change Analysis: Implications of the Singapore Case,’ in Richard Robison (editor), Routledge Handbook on Southeast Asian Politics (London: Routledge, 2012, pp. 120-34).
  • ‘Southeast Asia: The Left and the Rise of Bourgeois Opposition,’ in Richard Robison (editor), Routledge Handbook on Southeast Asian Politics (London: Routledge, 2012, pp. 25-39). [with Kevin Hewison]
  • ‘Progress and Limits in Regional Cooperation: Australia and Southeast Asia,’ in James Cotton and John Ravenhill (editors), Middle Power Dreaming: Australia in World Affairs 2006-2010 (Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2011, pp. 165-84).
  • ‘Political Accountability and Human Rights in Singapore,’ in Thomas Davis and Brian Galligan (editors),Human Rights in Asia (London: Edward Elgar, 2011, pp. 70-90).
  • ‘Goh’s Consensus Politics of Authoritarian Rule’ in Bridget Welsh, James Chin, Arun Mahizhan and Tan Tarn How (editors), Impressions of the Goh Chok Tong Years in Singapore (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 2009, pp. 61-70).
  • ‘Singapore “Exceptionalism”? Authoritarian Rule and State Transformation’ in Joseph Wong and Edward Friedman (editors), Political Transitions in Dominant Party Systems: Learning to Lose (New York: Routledge, 2008, pp. 231-51).
  • Political Regimes in Southeast Asia and the War on Terror’ in Damian Grenfell and Paul James (editors),Rethinking Insecurity, War and Violence: Beyond savage globalization? (London: Routledge, 2008, pp. 125-37).
  • ‘Neoliberalism and Transparency: Political Versus Economic Liberalism’ in Richard Robison (editor), The Neoliberal Revolution: Forging the Market State (London: Palgrave, 2006, pp. 197-215).
  • ‘Introduction: Globalization, Conflict, and Political Regimes in East and Southeast Asia’ in Garry Rodan and Kevin Hewison (editors), Neoliberalism and Conflict in Asia after 9/11’ (London: Routledge, 2006, pp. 1-24). [with Kevin Hewison].
  • ‘Neoliberal globalization, conflict and security: new life for authoritarianism in Asia? in Vedi R. Hadiz (editor)Empire and Neoliberalism in Asia (London: Routledge, 2006, pp. 105-22). [with Kevin Hewison]
  • ‘Theorising Markets in South-East Asia: Power and Contestation’, in Garry Rodan, Kevin Hewison and Richard Robison (editors) The Political Economy of South-East Asia: Markets, power and contestation(Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2006, pp. 1-38). [with Kevin Hewison and Richard Robison]
  • ‘Singapore: Globalisation, the State, and Politics’ in Garry Rodan, Kevin Hewison and Richard Robison (editors) The Political Economy of South-East Asia: Markets, power and contestation (Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2006, pp. 137-69).
  • ‘Westminster in Singapore: Now You See it, Now You Don’t’, in Haig Patapan, John Wanna and Patrick Weller (editors), Westminster Legacies: Democracy and Responsible Government in Asia and the Pacific(Sydney: University of New South Wales Press, 2005, pp. 109-28).
  • ‘Transplanting the neoliberal state in Southeast Asia’ in Richard Boyd and Tak-Wing Ngo (editors), Asian States: Beyond the developmental perspective (London: Routledge, 2005, pp. 172-98). [with Richard Robison and Kevin Hewison]
  • ‘Authoritarian Rule and Transparency Reform: Malaysia and Singapore After the Economic Crisis’ in Luigi Tomba (editor), East Asian Capitalism: Conflicts, Growth and Crisis (Milan: Fondazione Giangiacomo Feltrinelli, 2002, pp. 253-86).
  • ‘The Implications of the Asian Crisis for Media Control in Asia’ in Mark Beeson (editor), Reconfiguring East Asia: Regional Institutions and Organisations After the Crisis (London: RoutledgeCurzon Press, 2002, pp. 61-82).
  • ‘Introduction’, in Garry Rodan (editor), Singapore, International Library of Social Change in Asia-Pacific series, (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2001, pp. xi-xxxiii).
  • ‘Singapore: Globalisation and the Politics of Economic Restructuring’, in Garry Rodan, Kevin Hewison & Richard Robison (editors), The Political Economy of South-East Asia: Conflict, Crises, and Change(Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2001, pp. 138-77).
  • ‘Theorising South-East Asia’s Boom, Bust and Recovery’ (joint chapter with K. Hewison and R. Robison), in Garry Rodan, Kevin Hewison & Richard Robison (editors), The Political Economy of South-East Asia: Conflict, Crises, and Change (Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2001, pp. 1-43)
  • ‘The Prospects for Civil Society and Political Space in Southeast Asia’ in Amitav Acharya, B. Michael Frolic and Richard Stubbs (editors), Democracy, Civil Society and Human Rights in Asia (Toronto: Joint Centre for Asia Pacific Studies, 2001, pp. 55-88).
  • ‘Singapore: Information Lockdown, Business as Usual’ in Louise Williams and Roland Rich (editors), Losing Control: Freedom of the Press in Asia (Canberra: Asia Pacific Press, Australian National University, 2000, pp. 169-189).

Newspaper Articles since 2000:

  • ‘Electing a Redistributive Singapore’, The Wall Street Journal, 9 September 2015, p. 13.
  • ‘Singapore’s Evolution’, The Wall Street Journal, 24 March 2015, p. 11.
  • ‘Singapore’s Vaunted CPF under Fire,’ Asia Sentinel, 4 September 2014.
  • ‘Singapore Divides Over Elite Rule,’ The Wall Street Journal, 31 August 2011, p. 13.
  • ‘A Rare Contentious Election in Singapore,’ Asia Sentinel, 17 August 2011.
  • ‘Analyzing the Singapore Election: A Step on the Long Road to Political Pluralism?’ Asia Sentinel, 11 May 2011.
  • ‘Singapore’s “Accountability Election,”’ The Wall Street Journal, 6 May 2011, p. 11.
  • ‘Human Rights, Singapore Style,’ Far Eastern Economic Review, December 2009, pp. 27-31.
  • ‘Singapore Maneuvers in Response to Chee,’ Far Eastern Economic Review, December 2008, pp. 39-41.
  • ‘Scrutinizing Singapore’, The Wall Street Journal (Asia), 21 June, 2007, p. 13.
  • ‘Singapore’s Founding Myths vs. Freedom’, Far Eastern Economic Review, October 2006, pp. 13-17.
  • ‘A Singapore Surprise’, The Wall Street Journal (Asia), 9 May 2006, p. 15.
  • ‘Lion City Baits Mousy Opposition’, Far Eastern Economic Review, May 2006, pp. 11-17.
  • ‘Singapore’s Levers of Power’, The Wall Street Journal (Asia), 10-12 February, 2006, p. 13.
  • ‘Image of Singapore tarnished’, The Australian, 29 November 2005, p. 12.
  • ‘The Coming Challenge to Singapore Inc.’, Far Eastern Economic Review, December, 2004, pp. 51-4.
  • ‘Mahathir and Beyond’, The West Australian, 18 October, 2003, p. 20.
  • ‘Cyber Civil Society? Keeping a Tight Grip on the Internet’, Asian Wall Street Journal, 13 June 2002, p. A13.
  • ‘Goh seals vote before poll’, Australian Financial Review, 30 October 2001, p. 54.
  • ‘Opening for SingTel – but media doors keep closing’, Australian Financial Review, 24 August 2001, p. 75.
  • ‘Singapore tightens grip’, The West Australian, 30 June 2001, p. 26.
  • ‘Free press missing from Malaysia transparency plan’, Australian Financial Review, 27 January 2000, p. 17.
  • ‘Mental Block’, Asiaweek, 12 May, 2000, pp. 44-45.

Other Media Work:  

  • Regular commentator on various aspects of politics in Southeast Asia for Radio Australia, ABC Radio National, Radio Singapore International; television appearances on SBS programme ‘Dateline’, ABC Lateline, and CNN Biz-News; quoted and referred to in Asian Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Reuters, New York Times, Straits Times (Singapore), Business Times (Singapore), New Straits Times (Malaysia) and other regional and international publications and electronic services.