Dr Takeshi Moriyama
PhD in History and Asian Studies (Murdoch), MA in Literature and Communication (Murdoch), Grad Dip Ed (UTS)

Senior Lecturer in Japanese

About me

I teach Japanese language units, normally JPN203 Japanese 5, JPN301 Japanese 6, JPN302 Japanese 7 and JPN303 Japanese 8. Also I coordinate separate student exchange arrangements with ten Japanese universities. In research I engage in the field of Japanese cultural history, centring on its early modern period (1603-1868).

 

Teaching area

Teaching Japanese language units (2016)

  • JPN301 Japanese 6 (3rd Year 1st Semester Unit)
  • JPN302 Japanese 7 (3rd Year 1st Semester Unit)

Coordinating student exchange programs with Japanese universities for the unit of

  • JPN443/543 Semester in Japan

Research areas

Japanese history and culture in the early modern period (17th-19th centuries) – a special interest in centre-periphery interplay in the areas of:

  • provincial elite commoners – everyday life, arts and networks
  • print culture and the publishing industry
  • education, communication and popular literature
  • Western Studies

 

Current projects

I have been engaging in research in Japanese history under a large framework of theme titled ‘Uncommon Commoners in Tokugawa Japan’. The first project resulted in a monograph, Crossing Boundaries in Tokugawa Society: Suzuki Bokushi, a Rural Elite Commoner (Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2013). Currently I am working on the examination of the life of Shibata Shuzo (1820-1859) who was born to a fisherman’s family in a remote island but became a mapmaker for the shogun’s institute for Western Studies in the capital city of Edo.

Awards and grants

Teaching Awards:

Murdoch University Vice-Chancellor’s Excellence in Teaching Award (Team Teaching), 1994 (with Coveney, Muta, Takayashiki, Homma, Fukui and Nakamatsu).

Nomination for the Vice-Chancellor’s Excellence in Teaching Award (open/general category) 7 times: 1995, 1999, 2001, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2010.

Enhancing Learning Award:

Murdoch University Vice-Chancellor’s Citation for Excellence in Enhancing Learning (2010): “for outstanding contribution and sustained commitment to developing and leading an enriching student exchange program with Japanese universities”.

Grants:

Japan Foundation Intellectual Conference Grant for the 4th Japanese History Workshop Australia at Murdoch University, 2011.

INPEX Corporation Grant for the 4th Japanese History Workshop Australia at Murdoch University, 2011.

 

Events and speaking engagements

PUBLIC LECTURES:

「非凡な生を生きた徳川期の平人たち~地理学者柴田収蔵(1820-1859)の場合を中心に~」 学習院大学文学部史学科・文学会共催講演会 2016年11月16日 於学習院大学国際会議場 ‘Hibonna sei o ikita Tokugawa-ki no heinintachi: Chirigakusha Shibata Shuzo (1820-59) nobaai o chushinni’ (Uncommon lives of Tokugawa-period commoners: Geographer Shibata Shuzo 1820-59 and others, in Japanese), at Gakushuin University International Hall, Tokyo, 16 November 2016.

‘Giga Prints and Edo Society’ at The Japan Foundation Sydney, ‘Lines on Paper – Demystifying Woodblock Prints and Manga’, 16 October 2015

‘Love Stories on Sale: Ihara Saikaku (1642–1693) and Urban Culture of 17th-century Japan’ at 2012 Arts of Asia Lecture Series, the Art Gallery of NSW, 11 September 2012

‘Between a Snowy Village and the Edo Bunjin Salon: Suzuki Bokushi (1770-1842)’s Networks’, The 3rdworkshop of “Network Studies”, June 2011, Sophia University, Tokyo

‘Welcome to Edo’, Hyogo Cultural Centre Seminar, October 2010, Hyogo Prefectural Government Cultural Centre in Perth.

‘This Was Edo c1800: The Lively, Colourful and Fragile Metropolis of Utamaro’s Day’, The Art Gallery of NSW Symposium “Hymn to Beauty: The Art of Utamaro”, February 2010, the Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS:

‘Shibata Shūzō (1820-1859) and the Development of World Maps and Geography in the Late Tokugawa Period’, at the 6th Japanese History Workshop Australian and New Zealand, held at University of Auckland, 2 December 2016.

「19世紀前半の社会変化と辺境への知の流れ:佐渡人柴田収蔵の読書と遊学、地図製作」‘19-seiki zenhan no shakai henka to henkyo eno chi no nagare: Sadojin Shibata Shuzo no dokusho to yugaku, chizu seisaku’ (Social changes and knowledge flow to peripheries in the early 19th century: Reading, learning and mapmaking of Shibata Shuzo, Sado; in Japanese), at the 23rd Nichibunken (International Research Center for Japanese Studies) International Symposium, held at University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, 24 November 2016.

「地方民俗の記述―「中心」と「周縁」のインターアクションとして:鈴木牧之の『北越雪譜』と『秋山記行』」2016年度 日仏会館・國學院大學・東洋文庫共催ワークショップ 文人から学者へ ― 歩く・集める・記す 第二回(11月10日テーマ2:文人ネットワークと民俗誌)於東洋文庫 ‘Chihominzoku no kijutsu: “chushin” to “shuen” no inta akushon toshite no Suzuki Bokushi “Hokuetsu seppu” to “Akiyamakiko”’ (Writing about rural culture: Analysing Suzuki Bokushi’s Hokuetsu seppu and Akiyama kiko as interaction between “centre” and “periphery”, in Japanese), at the 2016 Collaborative Workshop of La Maison Franco Japonaise, Kokugakuin University and Toyo Bunko Oriental Library, Tokyo, 10 November 2016.

‘Making of a Mapmaker for the Shogun in the 1850s: Shibata Shūzō (1820-1859) and the Institute for Western Studies (Bansho shirabesho)’ at the 20th conference of Asian Studies Conference Japan, International Christian University, Tokyo, 2 July 2016

‘From a Fishing Village to the Shogun’s Centre for Western Studies: Shibata Shūzō (1820–59) and his Edo Experience’ at NZ ASIA Conference 2013, the University of Auckland, 22 November 2013

‘Study in Edo, 1850: An Island Doctor’s Days with Books, Maps, Mates and Sake’ (convening panel “Transforming and Performing Status in the Cities of Tokugawa Japan) at the 18th Biennial Conference of Japanese Studies Association of Australia, Australian National University, 9 July 2013

‘‘‘Publish But Not Perish”: Amateur Authors in the Provinces of Tokugawa Japan’, the 4th Japanese History Workshop Australia, November 2011, Murdoch University.

‘Print Culture in the Late Tokugawa Period: Rural Writers and Their Book-Publishing’, 27th Biennial Conference of Asian Studies Association ofAustralia, July 2010, University of Adelaide.

‘A Writing, Fighting and Dying Retiree in a Rural Elite Family: Suzuki Bokushi (1770-1842)’s “Isho”’, The National University of Singapore Japanese Studies Workshop on “Death and Dying in Early Modern Japan”, September 2009, National University of Singapore.

‘Letters from Edo to Echigo: Bunjin and Buntsū in the Late Tokugawa Period’, 16th Biennial Conference of Japanese Studies Association of Australia, July 2009, University of New South Wales.

‘Getting Connected: The Rural Literati’s Correspondence in the Late Tokugawa Period’, the 3rd Japanese History Workshop Australia, December 2007, University of Sydney.

‘How to Publish a Best-Seller: Authors in Late Tokugawa Japan’, the 2nd Japanese History Workshop Australia, November 2005, University of New Castle.

‘“Publishing My Book about the Snow Country at Edo”: A Rural Amateur, Urban Professionals and Book Publication in the Early Nineteenth Century of Japan’, 14th Biennial Conference of Japanese Studies Association of Australia, July 2005, University of Adelaide.

‘Suzuki Bokushi (1770-1842) and the Provincial Literati of Tokugawa Japan: Education, Arts, Communication’, Japanese History
Workshop Australia, November 2003, Hyogo Prefectural Government Culture Centre in Perth.

‘Suzuki Bokushi (1770-1842) and His Mercantile Peasant Household’, 12th Biennial Conference of Japanese Studies Association of Australia, July 2001, University of New South Wales.

‘Constituting a Family: Reading a Family Chronicle of a Country Literary-Merchant in Tokugawa Japan’, 11th Biennial Conference of Japanese Studies Association of Australia, December 1999, Central Queensland University.

‘Suzuki Bokushi: Kinsei Kōki Chihō-Bunjin no Zahyō’ (in Japanese), Syposium on Modern Japan: Diversity and Discrimination, Organized by the Japanese Studies and Languages Association of Western Austraila and Hyogo Prefectural Government Culture Centre, Perth, December 1998.

‘Overcoming “Hinomaru-like” Views on Japan: An Introduction to a Study of Suzuki
Bokushi and Country Literati in the Late Edo Period’, 10th Anniversary Conference of Japanese Studies Association of Australia, July 1997, University of Melbourne.

‘Quasi-Postmodernity in Edo Literature: Kōshoku Ichidai Otoko and Foucault’, 20th
Anniversary Conference of Asian Studies Association of Australia, July 1996, La Trobe University.

‘Problematisation of Contemporary Discourses on Sexuality in Edo Literature’, 9th Biennial Conference of Japanese Studies Association of Australia, July 1995, University of Queensland.

‘Ukiyo and the Postmodern’, 19th Biennial Conference of Asian Studies Association of Australia, July 1994, Murdoch University.

Publications

Books

  • Moriyama, T., (2013),Crossing Boundaries in Tokugawa Society: Suzuki Bokushi, a Rural Elite Commoner,Koninklijke Brill NV.

Journals

  • Moriyama, T., (2016), Study in Edo: Shibata Shuzo (1820-59) and Student Life in Late-Tokugawa Japan, East Asian History, , 40, pages 27 - 50.
  • Moriyama, T., (2013), Rural Poets' Publishing Projects in a Tokugawa-period Province, Japanese Studies, 33, 2, pages 161 - 170.
  • Moriyama, T., (2010), Unhappiness in Retirement: "Isho" of Suzuki Bokushi (1770-1842), a Rural Elite Commoner, Early Modern Japan (Print): an interdisciplinary journal, 18, , pages 26 - 40.
  • Moriyama, T., (2009), Communicating Provincials: The Correspondence Network of Suzuki Bokushi (1770-1842), Japanese Studies, 29, 1, pages 47 - 63.
  • Moriyama, T., (1997), Quasi-Postmodernity in Edo Literature: Koshoku Ichidai Otoko and Its Interpretive Potential Beyond Modernism, Japanese Studies Bulletin, 17, 1, pages 1 - 25.

Conference

  • Moriyama, T., (2000),Overcoming "Hinomaru-like" Views on Japan: An Introduction to a Study of Suzuki Bokushi and Country Literati,In: Conference Proceedings of Tenth Anniversary Conference of Japanese Studies Association of Australia, 1997.

Book (monograph):

Crossing Boundaries in Tokugawa Society: Suzuki Bokushi, a Rural Elite Commoner, Brill’s Japanese Studies Library volume 41 (Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2013).

Refereed journal articles:

‘Study in Edo: Shibata Shūzō (1820–59) and Student Life in Late Tokugawa Japan’, East Asian History, Issue 40 (2016), pp. 27-50. (http://www.eastasianhistory.org/40/Moriyama)

‘Rural Poets’ Publication Projects in a Tokugawa-period Province’, Japanese Studies, Vol. 33 No. 2 (2013), pp. 161–170.

‘Unhappiness in Retirement: “Isho” of Suzuki Bokushi (1770–1842), a Rural Elite Commoner’, Early Modern Japan: An Interdisciplinary Journal, Vol. 18 (2010), pp. 26–40.

‘Communicating Provincials: The Correspondence Network of Suzuki Bokushi (1770–1842)’, Japanese Studies, Vol. 29 No. 1 (2009), pp. 47–63.

‘Quasi-Postmodernity in Edo Literature’, Japanese Studies Bulletin, Vol. 17 No. 1 (1997), pp. 1–25.

Book Chapter:

‘“Hinomaru-like” Views on Japan: An Introduction to a Study of Suzuki Bokushi and Country Literati in the Late Edo Period’, in Vera Mackie, et al. (eds), Japanese Studies: Communities, Cultures, Critiques, Vol. 3 (Clayton, Victoria: Monash Asia Institute, 2000), pp. 25–40.

Symposium Proceedings (refereed):

「島から世界へ:幕末地理学者柴田収蔵の知の歩み」、郭南燕・将基面貴巳編『南半球から見る日本研究:歴史、政治、文学、芸術 海外シンポジウム2016オタゴ』国際日本文化研究センター 2018, pp. 89-101. ‘Shima kara sekai e: Bakumatsu chirigakusha Shibata Shūzō no chi no ayumi’ (From an island to the world: intellectual development of Shibata Shūzō, a geographer of late Tokugawa Japan), Japanese Studies Down Under: History, Politics, Literature and Art – Overseas Symposium 2016 Otago, (edited by Nanyan Guo and Takashi Shogimen), International Research Center for Japanese Studies, 2018, pp. 89–101.

Book review:

The Company and the Shogun: the Dutch Encounter with Tokugawa Japan. By Adam Clulow (New York: Columbia University Press, 2014)’, Australian Journal of Politics and History, Vol. 61 No. 1 (2015), pp. 164–165

UNPUBLISHED THESES

‘Crossing Boundaries: Suzuki Bokushi (1770-1842) and the Rural Elite of Tokugawa Japan’, (PhD thesis), Murdoch University, 2008.

Moriyama, T. ‘Edo and the Postmodern’, (MA thesis), Murdoch University, 1996.

GENERAL PUBLICATIONS:

‘200 nen mae no netto otaku tachi: Edo-kōki tsūshin jijō (Net-nerds 200 years ago: Condition of Communication in the late Edo period)’, Nishi gōshū Nihonjinkaihō,
April 2008, p. 3.

‘Gōshū to Nihongo kyōiku, Nihon ryūgaku (Australia and Its Japanese Language Education and Study-In-Japan Programme)’, Zeidai Tsūshin, No. 348, 1995, pp. 5-6.

‘Osutoraria Nihongo kyōshi jijō (Japanese Language Teachers in Australia)’, Kaigai Shūshoku Jōhō 95 (Tokyo: ALC Press, 1994), pp. 50-53.

(Round table discussion) ‘Nihongo kyōshi nitotte hitsuyōna gaikokugo nōryoku towa? (Foreign Language Proficiency for Japanese Teachers)’, Nihongo, September 1992,
pp. 7-12.

‘Nishi Osutoraria no Nihongo kyōiku jijō (Japanese Language Teaching in Western Australia)’, Nihongo, July 1992, pp. 67-68.

‘UTS dipuroma kōsu (Grad. Dip.Ed in UTS)’, Nihongo, March 1992, p. 86.

‘Tayori wa jibundake (Nobody Else But Myself)’, Nihongo, February 1992, pp. 96.

‘Gaikokujin toshite hataraku tameni (Work As a Foreigner in Australia)’, Nihongo,
January 1992, pp. 98-99.

‘Shidonī nikki 8 (Sydney Dairy 8)’, Nihongo, December 1991, p. 96.

‘Shidonī nikki 7 (Sydney Dairy 7)’, Nihongo, November 1991, p. 94.

‘Shidonī nikki 6 (Sydney Dairy 6)’, Nihongo, October 1991, pp. 96-97.

‘Shidonī nikki 5 (Sydney Dairy 5)’, Nihongo, September 1991, pp. 96-97.

‘Shidonī nikki 4 (Sydney Dairy 4)’, Nihongo, August 1991, p. 97.

‘Shidonī nikki 3 (Sydney Dairy 3)’, Nihongo, July 1991, p. 96.

‘Shidonī nikki 2 (Sydney Dairy 2)’, Nihongo, June 1991, p. 96.

‘Motto daredemo Nihongo o (Everyone’s Japanese)’, Nihongo, December 1990, p. 97.

‘Tanoshiku nakereba Nihongo ja nai (Let’s Enjoy Japanese)’, Nihongo, September 1990, pp. 29-30.

(Contributor) Yoroshiku: Moshi Moshi: Teachers’ Resources, National Japanese Curriculum Project (Melbourne: Curriculum Corporation, 1993). (wrote pp. 83-122)